December 29, 2016By Lance Baily

Cincinnati's St. Elizabeth 'Saves Christmas' with New Simulation Center

St. Elizabeth 'saves Christmas' with new Simulation Center

Cincinnati’s Soap Box Media recently covered the launch of a new simulation center “SIM” at the St. Elizabeth Training Education Center:

Imagine you’re a nurse in a hospital delivery room, and immediately after giving birth the mother starts hemorrhaging. It’s a situation you rarely face, maybe once in your career, but if you don’t do exactly the right thing very quickly, the mother’s life will be in peril.


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How does the hospital ensure that you know what to do when there’s no time to think? How do they train you, the physician, the anesthesiologist and the facility’s blood bank staff to pull together as a team and make the correct decisions? St. Elizabeth Healthcare is counting on its new Simulation Center to make the difference.

The SIM Center officially opened in late October as a 23,000-square-foot addition to the St. Elizabeth Training and Education Center, which itself opened in June. SETEC was fashioned from a former conference center in Erlanger to centralize all of St. Elizabeth’s staff training and development functions. The SIM Center utilizes lifelike mannequins in realistic hospital rooms with state-of-the-art equipment to create real-world scenarios for staff. And these aren’t the passive mannequins you might have seen used in CPR demonstrations.

SIM Center Manager Megan Vasseur says the mannequins have heartbeats, breathing sounds and pulses everywhere we have pulses, and some even blink, sweat and cry. One female mannequin delivers a baby, complete with a reservoir of blood and bodily fluids that do their thing at the appropriate time.

“These mannequins are very realistic, which is kind of a strange experience at first if you’re not used to it,” Vasseur said. “But they provide a much higher level of experience for our staff and help them develop better skills than the old way of working on each other or on live volunteers. We focus a lot of our simulation work on low-volume, high-risk situations that don’t happen all that often, but when they do, you have to be proficient at fixing them. With these mannequins, if you make a mistake it’s not life and death — you learn from your mistakes, practice your skills and get better.”


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