Patient Safety Movement Summit is Changing Healthcare

Last week in London, the 6th Annual World Patient Safety, Science & Technology Summit, organized with the support of the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, the Rt. Hon. Jeremy Hunt MP and co-convened by the European Society of Anaesthesiology, brought international hospital leaders, medical and information technology companies, the patient advocacy community, public policy makers and government officials, together to discuss solutions to the leading challenges that cause preventable patient deaths in hospitals across the world. The event has huge implications for healthcare simulation as much of our work directly aligns into their powerful goals to reach ZERO preventable deaths by 2020. Visit them through the link below to learn more after our recap:

The Summit featured keynote addresses from Director General, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreysus, Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt MP, as well as patient safety experts such as Martin Bromiley and Matthew Syed, plenary sessions with healthcare luminaries, members of the press and patient advocates, as well as announcements from organizations who have made their own commitments.


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During the event some key announcements and calls were made including:

President Bill Clinton Provided Keynote Address

Entering the room to a raucous standing ovation, President Clinton asked those assembled to focus on the sum of their collective efforts to eliminate preventable deaths in hospitals which could promise a better future for many generations. “I’ve lived long enough to know that in every endeavor there are no permanent victories and no permanent defeats. All there is, is the permanent gift of choice and life,” President Clinton began. He encouraged everyone in all aspects of the healthcare field, from CEOs to medical experts and patient advocates, to focus on the results of their efforts stating, “Everything we do gains more meaning when we give the simple gift of one more day to other people.” Adding upon the messaging of the World Health Organization’s Director-General, Dr. Tedros, President Clinton encouraged attendees to continue the serious work of eliminating preventable harm and begin focusing on helping the movement spread into the developing world. Before ending his keynote, the President sat down for an onstage Question and Answer Session with Patient Safety Movement Foundation Founder, Joe Kiani. He discussed the state of the US Healthcare Industry, Insurance companies and even what he would do as President. “I think the healthcare budget should be organized around the biggest problems and the biggest opportunities,” explained President Clinton. “We’ve made some progress in this but if we look at other healthcare budgets, Medicare, Medicaid and the VA, they are largely organized to serve the street population. On the surface, that’s good. But if you know you’re missing the larger opportunities, for example, in premature hospital deaths, then I think we should do that.”

Hospital Quality Institute (HQI), the California Hospital Association and the Patient Safety Movement Foundation (PSMF) formed a partnership to accelerate the reduction of medical errors and eliminate preventable patient deaths in hospitals across the Golden State. The central focus of the partnership will be an innovative, publicly available digital dashboard that will provide timely hospital patient safety data to hospitals, clinicians and consumers alike.  Unlike other patient safety tracking systems, which typically rely on data that is up to two years old, the data available on the digital dashboard will be updated regularly and posted on the websites of participating hospitals. “Patients and the public will be able to access important, up-to-date information on the continuous improvement of patient care provided by California hospitals,” said Julie Morath, HQI President and CEO.


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UK Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, Announces Groundbreaking New Measures at Day One of World Patient Safety Summit. Health and Social Care Secretary Jeremy Hunt launched groundbreaking new measures to improve patient safety in the National Health Service (NHS) during his keynote speech on Day One of the Summit. The Secretary took action in response to a scathing report published on Friday, which shows the shocking toll that medication errors take on patients and the NHS system. The research – some of the first of its kind in the world– shows that errors ranging from delivering a prescription an hour late to a patient being given the wrong medication, may cause approximately 1,700 deaths and are a contributing factor in 22,000 more. The NHS estimates its losses at £1.6 billion. As a result, Secretary Hunt set out to reduce patient harm and improve safety. These measures include:

  • Creating new systems linking prescribing data in primary care to hospital admissions
  • Evaluate prosecutorial response only should a pharmacist make an accidental medication errors due to gross negligence or malice
  • Accelerating the introduction of electronic-prescribing systems across more NHS hospitals this year.

World Health Organization Director General Outlines Five Building Blocks of Patient Safety

“The needless suffering of patients and their families is bad enough. But each adverse event erodes the most precious resource in health care, and that’s trust. When people aren’t sure whether it is safe to seek care, they will cease to seek care,” said Dr. Tedros Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization. No one should be harmed while seeking care. But the reality is that every year, millions of patients die or are injured because of unsafe and poor quality health care. Two-thirds of all adverse events occur in low- and middle-income countries. In his address, Dr. Tedros outlined five building blocks for creating a patient safety culture: strong leadership; clear policies; data-driven improvements; competent and compassionate health professionals; and people-centered care. Every instance of patient harm is a tragedy, but it is a double-tragedy if we do not learn from it and take steps to ensure the same thing never happens again.

About the Patient Safety Movement

More than 200,000 people die every year in U.S. hospitals and 3 million worldwide in ways that could have been prevented. The Patient Safety Movement Foundation was established through the support of the Masimo Foundation for Ethics, Innovation, and Competition in Healthcare to reduce that number of preventable deaths to 0 by 2020 (0X2020). Improving patient safety will require a collaborative effort from all stakeholders, including patients, healthcare providers, medical technology companies, government, employers, and private payers.

The Patient Safety Movement Foundation works with all stakeholders to address the problems with actionable solutions for patient safety. The Foundation also convenes the World Patient Safety, Science and Technology Summit. The Summit brings together some of the world’s best minds for thought-provoking discussions and new ideas to challenge the status quo. By presenting specific, high-impact solutions to meet patient safety challenges, called Actionable Patient Safety Solutions, encouraging medical technology companies to share the data their products are purchased for, and asking hospitals to make commitments to implement Actionable Patient Safety Solutions, the Patient Safety Movement Foundation is working toward zero preventable deaths by 2020.

Visit the Patient Safety Movement Website to Watch the Highlights!


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