Trauma Moulage Blood Effects: Part 3

Part 3 of MilitaryMoulage.com’s article on Theatrical Blood Effects for Realistic Casualty Simulation has been released! Written by Suzanne Patterson, Curriculum Development Specialist / Instructor at MilitaryMoulage.com, this is the next installment after part 1 and part 2, of a 4-part series!

blood splatter moulage

 

The MilitaryMoulage.com (or MMCIS™) website suggests they provide “the highest quality moulage training workshops for military and civilian casualty simulation personnel, regardless of their skill level, which helps companies or individuals achieve the greatest value for training investment dollars.”

Here’s an excerpt from the article on the types of products necessary to create blood for your trauma scenarios:


Sponsored Content:


“In the two previous blog posts in this series on theatrical blood effects we’ve discussed important facts and characteristics of human blood (and how it bleeds from the body) that you need to know in order to portray blood loss accurately in a simulation.  We also covered some important requirements and what to look for in choosing theatrical blood products for realistic portrayal.  Real time field training, clinical laboratory exercises and visual effects for film and TV production demand products with high fidelity elements for diverse types of real-to-the-eye end results.  Above all, they must contain the three prerequisites essential to high realism portrayals and that is opacity, texture, and color.  For film and TV use, this is vitally important as theatrical bloods can have different visual reactions in a range of light sources, especially in variable sunlight and stage/set lights.  To this end, you must be very careful in making sure the blood has the correct undertone in its color, so that it doesn’t render too orange or pink, or too purple or blue in camera.  If you ignore the undertone color then your simulation will have a visual skew in the overall performance fidelity, regardless if you have the right opacity, texture and redness in color.  In addition, it also must have a believable behavior/mobility on human skin or artificial appliances, meaning it must flow or dry realistically to the eye.

Theatrical blood products are available in 5 textures: thin liquids, thick syrups, semi-solid gels, solid pastes and dried/powders. Each has differing degrees of viscosity, along with a range of reds that you should always test first for color/undertone, texture and opacity before implementing them into your particular needs.  Always be aware of their classification as either cosmetic/external use only or food grade safe, especially if you are going to use it near the eyes, nose or in the mouth.”

blood moulage product

Learn about the 5-texture types for blood products and read the rest of this great article at Militarymoulage.com!


Sponsored Content: